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two moon lodge

 
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CHRIS



Joined: 31 Mar 2005
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 9:44 am    Post subject: two moon lodge Reply with quote

Hey guys just wondering if anyone has ever been to the two moon lodge area of Kipawa Lake? My first trip is going to be this July to Lake Kipawa and am really interested in any advice for fishing that area or how to obtain a topo map of the Lake? From everything I have read about Lake Kipawa it seems to be a good time. Looking forward to it!!!
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Ian
Largemouth Bass
Largemouth Bass


Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 367
Location: Granville, Ohio USA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 1:47 pm    Post subject: Fishing Tips Reply with quote

Chris,
First time up to the lake is an awesome time. If you take the time to read through this site you will find lots of good info on how to fish the lake. I am sure one of my fellow board members will comment on how the fish the Two Moons area. I fish the upper MacKenzie Island area. Our presentation style tend to be mostly trolling. I was shown how to fish the lake by the outfitter I stay with, Rod Miller. The style is simple yet effective for use. We troll points and dropoffs with 3” Hot-N-Tots. We hug the shoreline as we troll using depth finders and a sharp eye to watch for submerged rocks. We like to keep the boat in between 8-12’ of water. As the day turns to dusk and then to dark, we switch from shiny finished lures with a lot of flash to bright colored lures. If we hit fish, we will troll the same spot a few times or stop with worms. A simple presentation of a small gold Aberdeen hook and as light of a splitshot that you can cast and will still reach the bottom is the key here. If you get snagged the hook will easily straighten out and you can bend it back at the boat. Cast your line out let it settle to the bottom, wait, lift it up, allow it to resettle and repeat until you get a hit. Speaking of snags, if you get hung while trolling, back the boat past the spot of the snag and give a quick tug to free the lure. Try not to keep pressure on the lure while backing up but leave the line slack.
These are the methods we use on the lake, but other ways are effective too. Find a style that you are comfortable with and produces fish, then just have fun.
The biggest mistake I made the first few times going to the lake was bug repellant. If you use it around your tackle you will have a tough time catching fish. If you look down a couple of post you will see some discussion on bug jackets. I can recommend that a bug jacket is a must for anyone fishing the lake. You can use other methods that work for others, such as garlic, niacin, skin so soft ect… They may work I don’t know. I do know my bug jacket keeps the bugs off. For me bug management was critical, once I started using a bug jacket all was well. I will also mention I have been to the lake where there were not any black flies and mosquitoes about. I have sat by campfires and not had anything even land on me.
I have saved some posts in the past from some of the people on this board about how they fish the lake. Most came from our resident expert Jay Thomas (Jay may object to the reference of expert, sorry Jay) but all have some great tips. Rod, Ed, Mike, T-bone, ect…

Quote:
Presentations and Patterns
From Jay Thomas
Hi again Ian:
We tend to identify potential walleye fishing spots as you do - points with relatively close access to deep water ( 40 feet plus) and/or submerged islands (water on top 15-23 feet deep) surrounded by deep water.
Our most productive method has been bottom bouncing (10-20 feet deep) with a worm harness and a jumbo leech attached to the front hook only. The most productive worm harness last year was a Northland Float'N Spin with a 5 ft snell. Best colour was something called Red Tail but yellow/green and yellow/orange worked too. Although we caught walleye with worms on the worm harnesses, the productivity with leeches was much better.
We've also had success drifting (up to 35 feet deep) with light wire hooks and leeches with split shot up the line 18 or 20 inches.
I enjoy the challenge of crankbaiting whether trolling or casting. Unfortunately, my fishing partner isn't outfitted to fish this way and my time crankbaiting has been limited. However, I have already picked out a spot from the bathymetric map where I'll be casting some crankbaits at least one late evening this summer.
I concur completely with your observation that "most of the lake is good for fishing". Our group has been very impressed with the health of both the walleye fishery and the lake trout fishery, not just by what we have caught but also by what we have seen on electronics.
I'm hopeful that we all have good weather this comimg summer during our stays on Kipawa.
From Unknown

Ian, sounds like you've got the Walleye trolling presentation technique nailed. My only exception is lures and rigging. I use only Rebel floaters, sometimes straight sometimes jointed, silver/blue in sun and silver/black during overcast. I'll place a bell sinker, usually start with 1/4 oz about 20 inches up the line from the lure. Idea is to get a weight that bounces the bottom a little. Depth can be controlled by let out. This doesn't work well with other lures....I've tried but it kills the Walleye in Kipawa. Regardless, structure is the most important and shallow to deep relatively quickly as you pointed out is key. Like yourself when I hit a couple I'll switch to casting texas rigged worms, salted minnows, leeches or 1/4 black jigs (rubber or hair...hair preferred).
Now Lakers & Northerns are a different story which I'll have to get back to some other day. However, early spring, immediate after ice out in shallow bay water. Frozen 6-8 inch smelt on a bobber 3-4 ft up the line are Northern killers if you can stand the smell as the smelt thaw. Tried it only once and released several very large Pike. Got tired of the smelt smell as they thawed.
Also,I've experienced the encroachment of others that you aired and I laugh. Typically they're new to the area and like ourselves at times just looking for hints. As long as they don't troll through me or crank one into my boat I continue as before. Sometimes they watch and pick up some pointers, sometimes not. I don't much give a hoot about the spot as Kipawa has more than anybody could ever fish in a lifetime.
From T-Bone

Great subject Ian and I'm sure it will help us all to learn more by sharing our experiences and successes. From what I have read so far, we all use different tactics at essentially the same time of year. The following is what I wrote several weeks ago with some added detail, but since it appears you guys don't do a whole lot of jigging, I thought I'd post it again:
As for fishing presentation for walleyes, we use jigging 95% of the time right on the bottom with 1/3 crawler - some leeches. Look for a rock/sand transition area that is close to both shallow and deep water. If you can find one of these near an inside turn of a point, all the better. Early AM (5:00 AM) we would start in shallow, and then slide out as time progressed, finally stopping at about 22' by 8:00 AM. In the evening (6:00 PM), we'd start deeper and move shallow as the night wore on. By 9:15 PM or so, we'd cast light jigs (1/8 oz - 1/16 oz.) in to shore from 12' of water and get a fish on almost every cast. Most fish came from 12'-16' of water. The bigger fish came out of 18'-22'. The presentation is very refined...you couldn't be lazy. There was no room for "sleeping on the jig"...once they hit it you had to set the hook immediately or you would miss them. And when I say immediate, I mean within a half-second. A good sensitive rod was the key. Chartreuse with either a chartreuse Foxee or Fuzz-E-Grub body worked well as did smaller 2"-3" twister tails. Pink and white jig combinations also worked well. Most of us use 4 lb - 8 lb test...the lighter the better and don't get cheap on the line...buy good line as abrasion and wear are common. As for jigs, I've never tied one larger than 1/4 oz, but I'm sure if conditions got ugly or we had to fish deep, 3/8 oz - 1/2 oz would be necessary. The key to jigging is a tight presentation and paying attention to the feel of the jig. The bite is often very subtle and as stated, you have a split-second to set the hook. Last year, our group of 4 caught nearly 275 walleye in a 6 day week using this method.
We caught a several lake trout in about 60' of water anchored and "lazy" fishing....all were released. For the trout we were using vertical spinners with a frozen herring on a #3 hook. Just pull it up a few feet every 30 seconds or so. We caught a few 18"-20", and my buddy got a nice 12 lb. laker on our last day last year.
For pike, we throw big spoons or spinner baits in shallow bays; nothing fancy necessary as if there are pike near, they’ll smack it.
Once again, great topic and thanks to all of those that share insights as part of the Lake Kipawa Information Network....you guys know who you are.

To all the fishermen: Ian, Rod, Marco, T-Bone, and Jay. All your advice and techniques is great news. It was sound advice. Now here is my horoscope for trophy lake trout: No. 1 Plenty of patience, No. 2 A good seat cushion, No. 3 A Good novel (I read 3/4 of the novel I brought), No. 4 A good radio playing the song "Cruising Down The River on a Sunday Afternoon", No. 5 A light lunch, consisting of a good sardine sandwich, No. 6 A thermos bottle of tea". Be prepared to troll for 6 - 8 hours for trout in the middle of the lake from Boivin Narrows to Kipawa, back and forth. After about 7 hours of patience, my result was a 21 lb. lake trout. As there are 1,000 and 1 or more fishing lures on the market, the old Olympic June Bug, Red and White, or silver and red, for pickerel is still excellent. For trout, a Williams Wabbler 1/2 silver 1/2 gold, or all silver or all gold. Remember fish do have mood swings also. I have been lucky for pickerel when near shore. I check the depth and when there is a sudden drop in depth, I anchor there.
Best of luck to all......... John
Trout from Jay
Bruce:
Last week of June or first week of July is when we usually fish Lake Kipawa. We tend to fish for walleyes in the early morning (0530 - 0900 hrs) and in the evening (1800 - 1000 hrs). If we fish during the rest of the day, we usually fish for lake trout.
We fish one of 3 ways for lakers. Some of us will try long lining with mono and crankbaits. Others will use lead core and a big gang troll with a leadered hook and dead minnow. Some of us use portable downriggers and light mono with crankbaits or with spoons. We have caught lakers with all methods.
I would suggest that a depth sounder/fish finder is almost obligatory. During the first week of July last summer, we were marking lakers just above the thermocline near 100 feet (but these were not the active trout). Most of the trout we caught were between 30 and 40 feet deep.
One favourite method I use for lakers in western Quebec is trolling a # 3 EGB (best pattern is half copper half silver with red dots in silver on the front and all copper back) with the tail of a minnow attached to one of the hooks on the treble. Just experiment with amount of mono out until you start hitting fish.



Chris,
Be sure to check the regulations for this area before fishing. There are size limits and bait restrictions. You cannot use live minnow on the lake. You can use salted minnows.

I am going to make a request for all of us to join together to make a FAQ on how to fish the lake. Watch for my next post.

Welcome to the lake and our board.

Tight lines

~ Ian
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CHRIS



Joined: 31 Mar 2005
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 6:19 pm    Post subject: thanks for the info Reply with quote

Excellant info...just what I was looking for- Anybody else out there have anything to add I will be researching this lake right up until July- I still have not been able to come up with a topo map for this lake and would like one but you have given me some food for thought- Thanks again-
Chris
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Jay Thomas
Largemouth Bass
Largemouth Bass


Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 1658
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Chris:

Welcome to the board and to Lake Kipawa.

The topographic map for that end of Lake Kipawa is 31M/3 and is entitled Fabre. Lake Kipawa is approx 50 miles long. Consequently, you require three topographic maps to see most of it. The other two topo maps are 31L/14 and 31L/15. While you are waiting to buy your topo, you can have a look at an interent version of 31M/3 tonight at: http://toporama.cits.rncan.gc.ca/images/b50k/03/031m03.gif After you open this map, just click anywhere on the map to zoom in. Scroll to the right until you see a big bay with the name Lac Kipawa. Two Moon Lodge is about an inch above the words "Lac Kipawa" just behind that little island that looks like a C. You can also obtain a set of bathymetric maps (depth contour maps) free of charge by requesting the set from Diane.morin@menv.gouv.qc.ca Their reference numbers are C-8129-1, C-8129-2, C-8129-3, C-8129-4 and C-8129-5.

I have been fishing that area of Lake Kipawa the last 4 years. Three of those years we fished there in early July and last year we fished there in Sep. We moved our trip to Sep to escape the warmer Jul temperatures. All three years in Jul, we tended to catch walleyes bottom bouncing between 15 and 25 feet. In the early morning and late evening, we could catch walleyes shallower throwing jigs or light wire hooks with split shot.

I'd recommend that you review the contributions of many who post their fishing techniques for walleye, for lake trout, for pike or for white fish on this board. Those posts are available in the archives. Of course, if you have any questions for me, I'll do my best to respond if I can.
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CHRIS



Joined: 31 Mar 2005
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:01 pm    Post subject: Appreciate the info Reply with quote

Hi
I am really impressed with the information that I have gotten so far from the boards. This is my first fishing experience other than Lake Erie, Ohio Rivers and Saltwater, so my lake fishing is relatively limited. Thanks again for the topo link-
Chris
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Jay Thomas
Largemouth Bass
Largemouth Bass


Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 1658
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2005 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chris:

Here's a hyperlink to Quebec's Sport Fishing Regulations - in force until 31 Mar 07: http://www.fapaq.gouv.qc.ca/en/publications/fishing/index_05-06.htm

Lake Kipawa is in Zone 13 West

Noteworthy points in Quebec’s Sport Fishing Regulations are:

You will require a non-resident Quebec fishing license ($23 Cdn for 3 consecutive days, or $35 Cdn for 7 consecutive days or $52 Cdn for the year).

Sportfishing is usually practiced using a line. The line may be equipped with lures, hooks or flies, baited or not. Hooks may be single, double or triple. A lure or fly counts as a hook. A line must not have more than three hooks.

There is a minimum length limit of 12 inches for walleyes and 20 inches for lake trout in Lake Kipawa, measured from the snout to the fork in the tail. Where a length limit applies, fish must be transported so as to be able to measure their length. For the enforcement of the length limit on walleye fillets in Zones 11, 12, 13 and 16, the skin must adhere totally to the flesh over the entire length of the fillets.

The daily catch limit per licence for walleyes is 6 while the daily catch limit for lake trout is 2. The possession limit for walleyes is 6 while the possession limit for lake trout is 2. (I can provide a more detailed explanation of catch limits versus possession limits if you would like).

The licence-holder must include in his quota the fish caught and kept by all of the persons fishing under the authority of his licence. This also includes fish caught and eaten the same day.

Only dead bait-fish is authorized for use in Zone 13 West.
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